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Contextual Learning Portal

Cultivating Service-Learning in an Intergenerational Community Garden

Basics

  • Project TitleCultivating Service-Learning in an Intergenerational Community Garden
  • ThemeWorking with the Elderly; Hunger; Environment
  • Submitted ByChristine Ahearn/Lisa Shea
  • OrganizationConley Elementary School, Whitman-Hanson Regional School District
  • Brief DescriptionStudents will participate in a variety of activities based around two major projects:
  • Materials / ResourcesThe students began working on these issues last year and wanted to continue with the focus they started. The community need being addressed by these projects will include hunger and homelessness locally, working with senior citizens from the community to sustain a community garden.
  • Team membersChristine Ahearn, Charlene Sullivan, Mike Boyce, Donna Green, Karen Downey
  • Pre-requisite knowledgeStudents learned the science behind creating a garden at the elementary school. They used math to plan out plots. They wrote letters to local businesses to fundraise, and continued to fundraise through the creation of reusable environmentally friendly bags they decided were important after learning about recycling.
  • Any modifications or extensions for particular student populations?This project is accessible to all students.

Key Questions

  • Key QuestionsWhat are some of the issues in our community? How can we use what we are learning to help those in need?
  • Connections: How or why was this topic identified? Why is it meaningful?Students felt that this was an important topic in the community and wanted to make connections with the elderly when the learned that some elders have difficulty paying for healthy food. Students learned from their elders and gave back to this community, making a win-win with lasting relationships.
  • Background Research: What resources were used to find background information for this project?Students read newspapers, interviewed people inthe community and used the internet to reserach the topic of hunger. They heard from guest speakers about being tolerant participated in activities that fostered a community of tolerant, accepting students.
  • Outcomes: What was the outcome? How was it shared or applied in the community?Students became more open to learning with and from their elders. In the culminating activity, the "Souper" Bowl of Caring, students shared with their parents and elder mentors what they had learned through the project.

Units / Activities

Instructional Techniques

  • Pre-writingReflection on hopes for community garden, skillss that will assist in the creation of the garden
  • Direct TeachingHydroponics Lessons

Assessment Techniques

  • Unit TestHydroponics/Science Test
  • Project ReflectionPost-project reflection of lessons learned and feelings associated with intergenerational garden

Frameworks / Skills

  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    1.1
    Follow agreed-upon rules for discussion (raising one
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    2.1
    Contribute knowledge to class discussion in order to develop a topic for a class project.For example, students contribute to a list of the people they know about who are community helpers and decide whom they wish to invite to class to talk about the work they do.
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    2.2
    Contribute knowledge to class discussion in order to develop ideas for a class project and generate interview questions to be used as part of the project.For example, students interview community helpers, using questions the class has generated, and report the results to the class.
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • Science Framework (K-8)
    04 Earth
    Explain and give examples of the ways in which soil is formed (the weathering of rock by water and wind and from the decomposition of plant and animal remains)#
    (Science Framework (K-8))
  • Science Framework (K-8)
    05 Earth
    Recognize and discuss the different properties of soil, including color, texture (size of particles), the ability to retain water, and the ability to support the growth of plants#
    (Science Framework (K-8))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    3.1
    Give oral presentations about personal experiences or interests, using clear enunciation and adequate volume.
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    3.2
    Maintain focus on the topic.For example, students explain to the class why an object they bring from home is important to them.
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    3.3
    Adapt language to persuade, to explain, or to seek information.
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    3.4
    Give oral presentations about experiences or interests using eye contact, proper place, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation.For example, students give a presentation of information they have acquired from a class visit to the Children
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    3.5
    Make informal presentations that have a recognizable organization (sequencing, summarizing).
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • Science Framework (K-8)
    08 Life
    Describe how organisms meet some of their needs in an environment by using behaviors (patterns of activities) in response to information (stimuli) received from the environment# Recognize that some animal behaviors are instinctive (e#g#, turtles bury
    (Science Framework (K-8))
  • Science Framework (K-8)
    09 Life
    Recognize plant behaviors, such as the way seedlings
    (Science Framework (K-8))
  • Science Framework (K-8)
    10 Life
    Give examples of how organisms can cause changes in their environment to ensure survival# Explain how some of these changes may affect the ecosystem#
    (Science Framework (K-8))
  • Science Framework (K-8)
    11 Life
    Describe how energy derived from the sun is used by plants to produce sugars (photosynthesis) and is transferred within a food chain from producers (plants) to consumers to decomposers#
    (Science Framework (K-8))
  • Math Frameworks (K-6)
    4.M.1
    Demonstrate an understanding of such attributes as length, area, weight, and volume, and select the appropriate type of unit for measuring each attribute. :
    (Math Frameworks (K-6))
  • Math Frameworks (K-6)
    4.M.2
    Carry out simple unit conversions within a system of measurement, e.g., hours to minutes, cents to dollars, yards to feet or inches, etc. :
    (Math Frameworks (K-6))
  • Math Frameworks (K-6)
    6.M.1
    Apply the concepts of perimeter and area to the solution of problems. Apply formulas where appropriate. l
    (Math Frameworks (K-6))
  • Math Frameworks (K-6)
    K.D.1
    Collect, sort, organize, and draw conclusions about data using concrete objects, pictures, numbers, and graphs. l
    (Math Frameworks (K-6))
  • Math Frameworks (K-6)
    2.D.2
    Organize, classify, represent, and interpret data using tallies, charts, tables, bar graphs, pictographs, and Venn diagrams; interpret the representations. l
    (Math Frameworks (K-6))
  • Math Frameworks (K-6)
    4.D.1
    Collect and organize data using observations, measurements, surveys, or experiments, and identify appropriate ways to display the data. :
    (Math Frameworks (K-6))
  • Math Frameworks (K-6)
    4.D.2
    Match a representation of a data set such as lists, tables, or graphs (including circle graphs) with the actual set of data. l
    (Math Frameworks (K-6))
  • Math Frameworks (K-6)
    4.D.3
    Construct, draw conclusions, and make predictions from various representations of data sets, including tables, bar graphs, pictographs, line graphs, line plots, and tallies. s
    (Math Frameworks (K-6))
  • 21st century
    Financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy
    Knowing how to make appropriate personal economic choices. Understanding the role of the economy in society. Using entrepreneurial skills to enhance workplace productivity and career options.
    (21st century)
  • 21st century
    Civic Literacy
    Participating effectively in civic life through knowing how to stay informed and understanding governmental processes. Exercising the rights and obligations of citizenship at local, state, national and global levels. Understanding the local and global implications of civic decisions.
    (21st century)
  • 21st century
    Health Literacy
    Obtaining, interpreting and understanding basic health information and services and using such information and services in ways that are health enhancing. Understanding preventive physical and mental health measures, including proper diet, nutrition, exercise, risk avoidance and stress reduction. Using available information to make appropriate health-related decisions Establishing and monitoring personal and family health goals. Understanding national and international public health and safety issues.
    (21st century)
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    20.2
    Use appropriate language for different audiences (other students, parents) and purposes (letter to a friend, thank you note, invitation).
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    21.1
    After writing or dictating a composition, identify words and phrases that could be added to make the thought clearer, more logical, or more expressive.For example, after hearing classmates
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    22.3
    Write legibly in cursive, leaving space between letters in a word and between words in a sentence.
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • ELA Frameworks (PK-4)
    22.4
    Use knowledge of correct mechanics (end marks, commas for series, capitalization), usage (subject and verb agreement in a simple sentence), and sentence structure (elimination of fragments) when writing and editing.
    (ELA Frameworks (PK-4))
  • 21st Century
    Creativity and Innovation Skills
    Demonstrating originality and inventiveness in work. Developing, implementing and communicating new ideas to others. Being open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives Acting on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the domain in which the innovation occurs.
    (21st Century)
  • 21st Century
    Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills
    Exercising sound reasoning in understanding. Making complex choices and decisions. Understanding the interconnections among systems. Identifying and asking significant questions that clarify various points of view and lead to better solutions. Framing, analyzing and synthesizing information in order to solve problems and answer questions.
    (21st Century)
  • 21st Century
    Communication and Collaboration Skills
    Articulating thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively through speaking and writing. Demonstrating ability to work effectively with diverse teams. Exercising flexibility and willingness to be helpful in making necessary compromises to accomplish a common goal. Assuming shared responsibility for collaborative work.
    (21st Century)
  • 21st Century
    Initiative and Self-Direction
    Manage goals and time; Work independently; Be self-directed learners. Go beyond basic mastery of skills and/or curriculum to explore and expand one’s own learning and opportunities to gain expertise.
    (21st Century)
  • 21st Century
    Social and Cross-Cultural Skills
    Working appropriately and productively with others. Leveraging the collective intelligence of groups when appropriate. Bridging cultural differences and using differing perspectives to increase innovation and the quality of work.
    (21st Century)
  • 21st Century
    Leadership and Responsibility
    Using interpersonal and problem-solving skills to influence and guide others toward a goal. Leveraging strengths of others to accomplish a common goal. Demonstrating integrity and ethical behavior. Acting responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind.
    (21st Century)

Tags = intergenerational | environment | Subject = ELA, Mathematics, Science, Arts, Technology, Service_Learning | Grade Level = Elem | Time Period = | Program/Funding = 354 |
Direct website link to this project: http://resources21.org/cl/contextual.asp?projectnumber=87.2682