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Memorial Day Celebration

Basics

  • Project TitleMemorial Day Celebration
  • ThemeThe theme of this project is to provide our students with an awareness of the importance of veterans to our country. The United States, as a country, is indebted to those who have served in all of the branches of our armed services, to ensure that we can enjoy the freedoms set forth in our Constitution.
  • Submitted ByJulie Guerin, Rusti Plants-Prouty, Amy Polito, Carol Willard, Susan Rowden, Linda Friedman
  • OrganizationTantasqua Regional Junior High School
  • Brief DescriptionThis project is an interdisciplinary effort that culminates with our Memorial Day Celebration. Prior to Memorial Day, students will be reading the novel SUNRISE OVER FALLUJAH by Walter Dean Myers, about the current situation in Iraq. Students will also be writing poetry in English and reading classes that will be included in a booklet published for the Memorial Day Celebration, PATRIOTIC PROSE & POETRY.
    In social studies classes, students will be interviewing veterans. These interviews will be written in prose in English classes and included in the booklet of student work. Additionally in social studies, they will be discussing current events as they apply to the current situation in Iraq.
    In art classes, students will be creating artistic renditions of famous battle scenes using silk flowers, based on models viewed at the Worcester Art Museum. They will also be creating placemats for the Memorial Day breakfast for veterans. These will include various student poems that will be laminated for use in future years.
    This entire project will culminate on the Friday before Memorial Day with our Memorial Day Celebration. This begins with a breakfast for veterans hosted by the eighth grade. An assembly follows, with speeches from local dignitaries, student presentations, and musical performances. All of the veterans leave with their own copy of PATRIOTIC PROSE & POETRY and a thank you note made in health class.
  • Materials / ResourcesBooks - SUNRISE OVER FALLUJAH
    Publishing costs - PATRIOTIC PROSE & POETRY
    Placemat supplies and laminating paper
    Silk flowers
    Plaque to commemorate a former student who died in Iraq
    Favors for the Veterans
  • Team membersJulie Guerin, Carol Willard, Susan Rowden, Rusti Plants-Prouty, Ellen Canavan, Amy Polito
  • Pre-requisite knowledgeKnowledge about the rights and responsibilities of American citizens.
    Communication Skills - speaking, listening, and writing.
    Understaning the meaning of United States veterans.
  • Technical support neededMicrosoft Word and Publisher

Key Questions

  • Key QuestionsWhy are veterans important to this nation?
    What freedoms have our veterans ensured for us?
    What are the rights and duties of United States citizens?
    How does Art memorialize a veteran`s role in shaping our country?
  • Connections: How or why was this topic identified? Why is it meaningful?This project developed as an addition to an existing endeavor at Tantasqua. We have always felt that veterans should be recognized for their contributions to our country. This project allows us to expand this into an interdisciplinary effort.
  • Background Research: What resources were used to find background information for this project?Students will be interviewing veterans to learn more about their individual contributions to our country.
    The additional novel was selected to bring veteran appreciation and recognition up to the current crisis in Iraq.
    The art component was added to provide an additional dimension to this project.
  • Outcomes: What was the outcome? How was it shared or applied in the community?The outcome was the implementation of an expanded Memorial Day Celebration on the Friday before Memorial Day. Local veterans and local dignitaries attended a breakfast, interacted with our students, and viewed what our students have created. After the breakfast there was a ceremony. The ceremony included speeches, students reading their writing, patriotic music and songs.

Units / Activities

  • Poetry UnitStudents will read poetry and identify, analyze and apply knowledge of: poem structure elements, various kinds of poems, and themes in a poem and provide evidence to support their understanding.
    Students will identify and analyze how a poet appeals to the senses, creates imagery, suggests mood, and sets the tone.
    Students will become more familiar with word usage; synonyms, the degrees(s) of emotion contained in words and the manipulation of language to impact meaning. The third step would be to focus on the technical ingredients, adding alliteration, personification, color, imagery and similes, and rigidly try to adhere to consistency and a pattern of rhyme.
    Through the use of dramatic reading students build a greater understanding of poetry and the poet
    Copies of Poems, Pictures of war scenes, poetic terms for each poem presented, highlighter pen, & poetry journals.
  •  

    View/Download File: Poetry Unit Plan

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/csl Lesson Plan Template.doc

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/CSL war poetry_797.doc

  • Patriotic Prose & Poetry assignmentStudents will interview veterans and write phase biographies. They will write essays and poetry related to America`s freedoms and the veterans who have allowed us to maintain these freedoms. The will be developing skills required in the ELA frameworks.Samples of phase biographies, essay, and poetry.
  • Novel - SUNRISE OVER FALLUJAHStudents will read the Walter Dean Myers novel and learn about the current crisis in Iraq.Discussion/study guide
  • Interviews of veteransStudents, through social studies classes, will interview veterans. these interviews will be used to create phase biographies in English class. Some of these will be published in Patriotic Prose & Poetry.Suggested interview questions
  •  

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/Memorial Day Celebration.doc

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/Memorial Day Celebration.doc

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/mock interview questions.doc

  • Current events- Keeping up with current activities in Iraq and Afghan-istanIn social studies classes the students discuss current events. The students develop an understanding of political issues in the Middle East and the impact on global events. The Boston Globe Channel 1
  • Art - Silk flower arrange-ments depicting battle scenesStudents will be viewing historical artwork related to veterans. Using silk flowers, students will be recreating these pieces of art for display during the Memorial Day breakfast and celebration.Resource - Worcester Art Museum Exhibit Placard-including Frameworks Photos of Floral Interpretations
  •  

    Web Link: http://www.worcesterart.org/Events/Flora/Flora_08/flora_in_winter_2008.html

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/Art Exhibit Placard FLORAL INTERPRETATIONS OF HISTORIC ART.doc

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/FLORAL INTERPRETATIONS OF MEMORIAL.doc

  • Art -Poetry placematsPoetry written in English and Reading classes will be transferred to place mats that will be used at the Memorial Day breakfast for veterans.Student work.
  • HealthStudents will be creating favors, baking, and serving during the Memorial Day breakfast.
  • Breakfast and CeremonyLocal veterans are invited to a breakfast and Memorial Day Ceremony.
  •  /project22_2716/IMG_2877.JPG

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/mdci.doc

    View/Download File: /project22_2716/Memorial Day Ceremony - Letter to parents.doc

Instructional Techniques

  • Pre-writing Journal thoughts and ideas about poems Coaching as needed Poetry Writing Instruction as needed Interactive experience through exploration of poetry, preparation, brainstorming activities, repeated readings of chosen poems, note observations in poetry journals, underline/highlight significant areas of poems independently, showing important connections, contradictions, and colossal moments, constant vocab. and literary terms related to poetry review.
  • Mock interviewsUsing interview questions about pre-school in the year 2000, students practiced their interview strategies with their classmates.
  • Graphic organizersFrameworks for students to evaluate information gathered from the interviews determining facts, personal anecdotes, and assessing the impact of their experience with the military.
  • VocabularyReview unfamiliar military vocabulary.Review of poetic elements and vocabulary
  • Reading, writing , and evaluating strategies referred to in the ELA FrameworksExample: peer editing, sharing of student of work, oral retelling and readings of poems
  • Reflective writingStudents will be sharing their thoughts on the importance of America`s veterans. Answering poetry related questions.
  • Web SearchStudents may need to do additional research to provide background information.Online poetry finder and for relevant images to illustrate their poems.

Assessment Techniques

  • Assess finished Memorial Day poems for required elements and Peer Evaluations.Analyze and interpret poetry through repeated oral and silent readings and whole class.
    Small group discussions in reference to poems being studied.
    Students will listen to and read a variety of Memorial Day/ war poems, discuss their differing elements and characteristics while recording them on a chart for the purpose of comparison.
    Students will read poems for increased fluency and improvement of presentation & oral language skills.
    Students will write Memorial Day poems, using the discussed and required poetic techniques, illustrate them, and present them orally to an audience.
    Using a poem as a model, find a new poem that preserves the rhythm and structure of the studied poem. I.E. Inspired by
  • Reflections on Memorial DayThe students share their thoughts about the ceremony at the school. The students participate in a discussion about how their towns celebrated Memorial Day and share family activities from Memorial Day week-end. After the discussion the students write an essay on the true meaning of Memorial Day and compare the essay to their writing when we started the unit.
    Students will complete various journal entries.
  • Study guide and test on novelStudents will complete the study guide and final test on the book Sunrise Over Fallujah.
  • Esaays/PoemsStudents will complete the essay and/or poetry assignments. Some of their work will be published along with the veteran phase biographies in Patriotic Prose & Poetry.

Frameworks / Skills

  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    1.5
    Identify and practice techniques such as setting time limits for speakers and deadlines for decision-making to improve productivity of group discussions.For example, in preparation for a student council meeting, students plan an agenda for discussion, including how long they will allow each speaker to present a case or argument. They build into their agenda time for making decisions and taking votes on key issues.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    2.6
    Analyze differences in responses to focused group discussion in an organized and systematic way.For example, students read and discuss
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    4.23
    Identify and use correctly idioms, cognates, words with literal and figurative meanings, and patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or functions.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    4.25
    Use general dictionaries, specialized dictionaries, thesauruses, or related references as needed to increase learning.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    5.28
    Identify correct mechanics (semicolons, colons, hyphens), correct usage (tense consistency), and correct sentence structure (parallel structure).
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    6.10
    Identify formal and informal language in stories, poems, and plays.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    6.8
    Identify content-specific vocabulary, terminology, or jargon unique to particular social or professional groups.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    6.9
    Identify differences between the voice, tone, diction, and syntax used in media presentations (documentary films, news broadcasts, taped interviews) and these elements in informal speech.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    8.32
    Identify and analyze the point(s) of view in a literary work.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    8.33
    Analyze patterns of imagery or symbolism and connect them to themes and/or tone and mood.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    8.34
    Analyze and evaluate the logic and use of evidence in an author
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    9.6
    Relate a literary work to primary source documents of its literary period or historical setting. For example, students read The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne. In order to deepen their understanding of the early colonial period and of Puritan beliefs, they read poems by Anne Bradstreet, transcripts of witch trials in Salem,
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    9.7
    Relate a literary work to the seminal ideas of its time.For example, students read Matthew Arnold
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    10.5
    Compare and contrast the presentation of a theme or topic across genres to explain how the selection of genre shapes the message.For example, students compare and contrast three reactions to Lincoln
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    10.6
    Identify and analyze characteristics of genres (satire, parody, allegory, pastoral) that overlap or cut across the lines of genre classifications such as poetry, prose, drama, short story, essay, and editorial.For example, as they read Joseph Heller
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    11.5
    Apply knowledge of the concept that the theme or meaning of a selection represents a view or comment on life, and provide support from the text for the identified themes.For example, students analyze and compare selections from Russell Baker
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    11.6
    Apply knowledge of the concept that a text can contain more than one theme.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    11.7
    Analyze and compare texts that express a universal theme, and locate support in the text for the identified theme. For example, students compare Sophocles
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    12.6
    Analyze, evaluate, and apply knowledge of how authors use techniques and elements in fiction for rhetorical and aesthetic purposes.For example, students analyze events, point of view, and characterization in Toni Morrison
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    14.6
    Analyze and evaluate the appropriateness of diction and imagery (controlling images, figurative language, understatement, overstatement, irony, paradox). For example, students examine poems to explore the relationship between the literal and the figurative in Mark Strand
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    19.30
    Draw pictures and/or use letters or phonetically spelled words to give others information.For example, Kindergartners draw pictures showing how they planted daffodil bulbs in the school garden and as a group, put the pictures into chronological order.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    19.25
    Write poems using a range of poetic techniques, forms (sonnet, ballad), and figurative language.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    19.29
    Write poems using a range of forms and techniques.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • 21st century
    Civic Literacy
    Participating effectively in civic life through knowing how to stay informed and understanding governmental processes. Exercising the rights and obligations of citizenship at local, state, national and global levels. Understanding the local and global implications of civic decisions.
    (21st century)
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    20.5
    Use different levels of formality, style, and tone when composing for different audiences. For example, students write short personal essays on a variety of topics such as beliefs, goals, achievements, memories, heroes, or heroines. Students decide on an audience and purpose for their pamphlet, such as a r
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    20.6
    Use effective rhetorical techniques and demonstrate understanding of purpose, speaker, audience, and form when completing expressive, persuasive, or literary writing assignments.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    21.9
    Revise writing to improve style, word choice, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed. For example, after rethinking how well they have handled matters of style, meaning, and tone from the perspective of the major rhetorical elements, graduating seniors revise a formal letter to their school committee, detailing how they have benefited from the education they have received in the district and offering suggestions for improving the educational experience of future students.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    23.13
    Organize ideas for a critical essay about literature or a research report with an original thesis statement in the introduction, well constructed paragraphs that build an effective argument, transition sentences to link paragraphs into a coherent whole, and a conclusion.For example, students write an essay on the causes for the murder of Lenny in Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck. They choose the deductive approach, describing the murder and then explaining the causes, or the inductive approach, explaining the causes and then describing the murder.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    23.15
    Craft sentences in a way that supports the underlying logic of the ideas.For example, after writing a critical essay, students examine each sentence to determine whether the placement of phrases or dependent clauses supports the emphasis they desire in the sentence and in the paragraph as a whole.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    24.5
    Formulate open-ended research questions and apply steps for obtaining and evaluating information from a variety of sources, organizing information, documenting sources in a consistent and standard format, and presenting research.For example, after reading an article about record high prices for Van Gogh paintings in current auctions, a student decides to research whether Van Gogh
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    24.6
    Formulate original, open-ended questions to explore a topic of interest, design and carry out research, and evaluate the quality of the research paper in terms of the adequacy of its questions, materials, approach, and documentation of sources.For example, as they study the modern history of Native American groups, students analyze the difference between open-ended research questions and
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • ELA Frameworks (HS)
    25.6
    Individually develop and use criteria for assessing work across the curriculum, explaining why the criteria are appropriate before applying them.For example, students design their own criteria to evaluate research projects in English language arts or local history. Before a review panel of students, family, and community experts, students justify these criteria and explain how they have applied them.
    (ELA Frameworks (HS))
  • 21st Century
    Creativity and Innovation Skills
    Demonstrating originality and inventiveness in work. Developing, implementing and communicating new ideas to others. Being open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives Acting on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the domain in which the innovation occurs.
    (21st Century)

Tags = history | veterans | Subject = ELA, History, Arts, Service_Learning | Grade Level = MS | Time Period = | Program/Funding = |
Direct website link to this project: http://resources21.org/cl/contextual.asp?projectnumber=22.2716